'Yeshiva stabber' acquitted

Court acquits yeshiva student who repeatedly stabbed peer, finds he was in 'psychotic state', cannot be held responsible for actions.

David Rosenberg,

Suspect in stabbing in yeshiva in Kiryat Sefer neighborhood of Modiin Illit
Suspect in stabbing in yeshiva in Kiryat Sefer neighborhood of Modiin Illit
Yonatan Sindel/Flash90

A haredi yeshiva student accused of stabbing a fellow student in the chest has been acquitted, after it was determined that the suspect was in a “psychotic” state at the time of the incident, and could not be held responsible for his actions.

In August, a 17-year-old student at the Knesset Hagedolah yeshiva on Hafetz Haim Street in the haredi city of Modi’in Illit repeatedly stabbed a fellow student in the chest.

Police were called to the scene of the incident, and quickly apprehended the perpetrator, who had fled to his dorm room after the stabbing.

The victim, who suffered three stab wounds to the chest, was evacuated in serious condition to Tel Hashomer Medical Center in Ramat Gan.

According to police, the suspect approached the victim, while carrying a concealed knife.

The suspect asked the victim to approach him, saying, “Come here for a second, I want to tell you something.” He then drew the knife and said “I’ll show you what this is,” before stabbing the victim three times in the chest.

Last month, prosecutors charged the suspect with attempted murder – later amended to assault with intent to cause bodily harm - though his attorney claimed the suspect suffered from “a serious mental illness”, prompting the Jerusalem Magistrate’s Court to send the suspect for psychiatric evaluation to assess his fitness to stand trial.

The evaluation found that the suspect had been in a “psychotic state” at the time of the stabbing, and could not be held accountable for his actions.

On Sunday, the Central District Court ruled that the suspect could not be held responsible for his actions, acquitting him, Kikar Hashabbat reported Sunday night.

Justice Ami Kovo noted in his decision that police had accepted the argument that the suspect could not be held responsible for his behavior.

“The accused was not responsible for his actions at the time of the offense, and with the agreement of both sides, I order the defendant acquitted.”




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