Technion president: We weren't panicked, we were shocked

Technion President Prof. Peretz Lavie says school is opposed to rabbis' letter condemning LGBTQ activists.

Uzi Baruch,

the Technion
the Technion
The Mossad website

Technion President Professor Peretz Lavie rejected in a letter to Arutz Sheva a report about the "panic" surrounding the signature of Rabbi Dr. Elad Dukov on a letter of Israeli rabbis criticizing pro-LGBTQ organizations.

"I would like to make it clear that the Technion administration was not alarmed by Rabbi Dukov's signature on the letter of the rabbis, but was shocked by the content of the letter and the opinions presented there," Lavie wrote.

"Rabbi Elad Dukov is the rabbi of the Technion synagogue, and he is not the 'rabbi of the Technion', a title that does not exist at all, and his signature on the rabbis' letter reflects his personal opinion and not the Technion's position," he wrote to Arutz Sheva.

"The letter from the rabbis stands in stark contrast to the spirit of the Technion, which advocates full equality for all people, regardless of their social, religious and cultural affiliation.

"I would like to point out to you that Prof. Hagit Attia, a member of the Technion's board of directors, who serves as the Technion's vice president for academic affairs and is raising two children with soldiers in compulsory service, expressed strong protest against Rabbi Dukov's remarks.

"Even before the Technion opened its gates about 100 years ago, its founders declared that the institution they wish to establish will be open to all regardless of religion, race or gender. Even today, at the top of my list of priorities as president of the Technion, is the task of ensuring a safe and secure study and work environment for everyone at the Technion, students, faculty and employees alike.

"The Technion serves as a model for tolerance in Israeli society and we are determined to continue to act in this spirit in the future as well. "




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