Diaspora restaurants seek Tzohar kashrut certification

Tzohar distributes booklets in synagogues throughout Israel on how to keep kosher while vacationing abroad.

Ido Ben Porat,

Rabbi David Stav
Rabbi David Stav
Yoni Kempinski

Jewish restaurants and business owners from the Diaspora have turned to the Tzohar Rabbinical Association and asked to receive its kashrut supervision and certification over the summer, when many Israelis take vacations abroad.

The organization expressed satisfaction at the fact that the kashrut line it initiated in Israel has begun to cross borders, but noted in a conversation with Arutz Sheva that as of today, kashrut certification will be given only to food businesses in Israel.

However, it is possible that in the future, as the initiative grows, the certification will be given to businesses abroad.

In the meantime, the Jewish traveler abroad will be able to use an excellent Kashrut booklet that will be distributed this Shabbat in synagogues across Israel, written by Rabbi Oren Duvdevani, head of the Kashrus organization of the Tzohar Rabbinical Association.

In the booklet, the Israeli traveler will be able to find various laws dealing with kashrut, including how to keep kosher abroad. The booklet will deal will complex issues such as staying in a hotel abroad over Shabbat and will provide lists of kosher products in various countries.

Rabbi Oren Duvdevani said that "Kashrut is identity, perhaps one of the most significant components of the sanctity of Jewish identity. Tzohar is right here for that prupose, to strengthen Jewish identity and kashrut in Israel. We are giving today the most meaningful and effective tool for this. "

Rabbi David Stav said before the publication of the booklet that this is another step by the Tzohar Rabbinical Association to make Kashrut more accessible to the Israeli company that wants to keep kosher abroad. "This time we have included the laws of Shabbat in the booklet so that travelers can observe the Sabbath and its laws in light of the many technological challenges facing the traveler who wishes to observe Shabbat."




top