Women's organizations oppose Override Clause

18 women's groups take a stand on the political issue.

Gil Ronen,

Judges on Supreme Court
Judges on Supreme Court
Yonatan Sindel/Flash90

Eighteen women's organizations appealed to Finance Minister Moshe Kahlon to prevent the enactment of the Override Clause, which would limit the Supreme Court's ability to invalidate laws.

The largest organization to sign the letter is WIZO (Women’s International Zionist Organization). Most of the other organizations are identified in one way or another with the New Israel Fund, including the Israel Women's Network, the Association and Centers of Assistance for Victims of Sexual Assault in Israel, the Israel Association for Feminist and Gender Studies, Women Lawyers for Social Justice, Sister, Isha L’isha (“Woman to Woman”), Amerat of the Desert, and more.

"The Supreme Court is supposed to protect minority rights in the country," the organizations wrote. "As organizations that have promoted women's rights for decades and work to reduce discrimination against women in Israel, we often have harsh criticism of the court. At the same time, the undersigned organizations are aware of the need and historic importance of the Supreme Court, which granted women basic and important rights denied by the existing law.

"In addition, as members of women's organizations, we understand how women from minority groups in the population need the protection of the Supreme Court against the changing whims of Knesset members. Often, under changing political circumstances, the rights of women from disadvantaged groups - like Arab women, haredi women, Mizrahi women, women of Ethiopian origin, Russian speakers and asylum seekers - are not preserved. "

As an example of its importance for women, the letter noted that the court rejected the section of the law that deprived the income support benefit from "single parent" mothers for the use or possession of a vehicle. "By virtue of the Supreme Court ruling on this matter, the section of the law was changed and the injustice - which had previously been approved by the legislature - was prevented for women from disadvantaged populations."

The organizations noted that "The real concern of women's organizations, who represent hundreds of thousands of women in Israel, is that many women's rights that are the fruits of a decades-long struggle for equality will be lost by changing legislation that is subject to national mood, coalition considerations and public opinion."




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