Erdan: Supreme Court protects minorities and harms majority

Minister supports Overrule Clause but prefers discussion with Supreme Court justices. 'Impossible that Knesset can't change Court decision.'

Hezki Baruch,

Erdan
Erdan
Flash 90

Internal Security Minister Gilad Erdan said today he supports passage of the Overrule Clause that would under specified conditions allow the Knesset to re-enact laws disqualified by the Supreme Court.

At the cabinet meeting's opening Erdan referred to the upcoming meeting between the Prime Minister and the Supreme Court Chief Justice. "I think it's possible to discuss with the Supreme Court justices and coalition elements a majority of between 61 and 65 Knesset members. More than this would counteract the very intention of the Overrule Clause," he said, referring to the debate on how much of a majority will be required to re-approve a law rejected by the Supreme Court.

Erdan says when the Supreme Court protects a minority's rights, it violates the rights of the majority: "It must always be remembered, it's about protecting rights of minorities. The Knesset itself is the one who legislates many laws dealing with minorities' rights. All-in-all the Knesset wants to retain the right to defend also the majority of the State of Israel's citizens.

"When the Supreme Court prefers the rights of infiltrators, it necessarily violates the rights of residents of South Tel Aviv or other cities, and when the court prefers some specific right, it often violates a much larger or much broader right of other citizens in the state. It's impossible that after such Supreme Court decisions by a limited number of people, the Knesset would not be able, by a special majority representing the majority of the country's citizens, to change a Supreme Court decision," the Minister said.



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