Trump to visit Britain in July

U.S. President previously cancelled a trip to London likely due to concerns he would face mass protests.

Ben Ariel,

Donald Trump and Theresa May
Donald Trump and Theresa May
Reuters

U.S. President Donald Trump will visit the UK on July 13, the BBC reported on Thursday, after previously cancelling a trip due to concerns he would face mass protests.

It will not be the full-blown state visit Trump was promised when Prime Minister Theresa May visited the White House in January last year, but an invitation to a state visit still stands, according to the report.

Trump will hold talks with May, Downing Street said, with further details to be "set out in due course". The BBC reported the president was likely to meet the Queen during the visit as well.

The prime minister said she was "looking forward to welcoming President Trump to the United Kingdom for a working visit on July 13."

Trump was expected to travel to England in February, his first trip to Britain since taking office last January, but he abruptly cancelled the trip, writing in tweet that the cancellation was due to a “bad deal” for a new U.S. embassy in London.

“Reason I canceled my trip to London is that I am not a big fan of the Obama Administration having sold perhaps the best located and finest embassy in London for ‘peanuts,’ only to build a new one in an off location for 1.2 billion dollars. Bad deal. Wanted me to cut ribbon-NO!,” he wrote.

The decision to relocate the U.S. embassy in Britain from Grosvenor Square across the Thames to Nine Elms Lane was actually made during the last months of the Bush administration in 2008. At the time, officials cited security concerns, claiming that the existing structure could not be properly reinforced.

Critics said Trump's decision to cancel the visit may have been driven by a fear of protests.

British officials have been dismayed by some of Trump’s pronouncements, including when the president rebuked May on Twitter after she criticized him for retweeting a series of videos posted by the leader of an extremist British political group.

One of Trump's biggest critics has been London Mayor Sadiq Khan, who called to cancel the president's visit after he retweeted the offensive videos

On Thursday, Khan tweeted the president would experience a city that chose "unity over division".

"If he comes to London, President Trump will experience an open and diverse city that has always chosen unity over division and hope over fear. He will also no doubt see that Londoners hold their liberal values of freedom of speech very dear," he wrote.




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