Germany: Iran deal can't be renegotiated

Spokesman for German Foreign Ministry says keeping the nuclear deal with Iran is a top priority for the country.

Elad Benari,

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Flag of Germany
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Germany said on Wednesday that keeping the international nuclear deal with Iran is a top priority for the country and it cannot be renegotiated.

"For us, the position stays clear - the highest priority is keeping the nuclear agreement and full implementation on all sides," said a spokesman for the German Foreign Ministry, who was quoted by Reuters.

"The nuclear agreement was negotiated with 7 countries and the EU and can't be renegotiated... but it is also clear that beyond the nuclear agreement we want to make sure that Iran's nuclear program serves exclusively peaceful purposes," added the spokesman.

He noted that French President Emmanuel had proposed a supplementary agreement to solve the problem.

"We must look at this proposal carefully. The question is under what circumstances would Iran be prepared to let this process happen. We are in close and constructive exchange within the EU-3 and the U.S.," said the spokesman, according to Reuters.

His comments come as a May 12 deadline looms for the U.S. to decide on restoring sanctions on Tehran.

President Donald Trump, who has blasted the 2015 nuclear deal as “the worst deal ever negotiated”, in January decided to extend a waiver on nuclear sanctions that were imposed on Iran.

However, he made clear it was the last time he would extend the waiver and has given the European signatories the May 12 deadline to “fix the terrible flaws” of the deal.

On Tuesday, Trump met at the White House with Macron, who has been leading an effort by France, Britain and Germany to find those "fixes" to the deal that would satisfy Trump's objections.

On Tuesday, Trump met at the White House with Macron, who has been leading an effort by France, Britain and Germany to find those "fixes" to the deal that would satisfy Trump's objections.

"No one knows what I'm going to do on the 12th, although Mr. President, you have a pretty good idea," Trump told Macron at Tuesday's meeting, adding that if he does withdraw, he would look to see "if it will be possible to do a new deal with solid foundations, because this is a deal with decayed foundations."

Iranian leaders have warned Trump not to withdraw from the deal. Last week, Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif warned the United States there would be “unpleasant” consequences if it leaves the deal.

Germany said on Wednesday that keeping the international nuclear deal with Iran is a top priority for the country and it cannot be renegotiated.

"For us, the position stays clear - the highest priority is keeping the nuclear agreement and full implementation on all sides," said a spokesman for the German Foreign Ministry, who was quoted by Reuters.

"The nuclear agreement was negotiated with 7 countries and the EU and can't be renegotiated... but it is also clear that beyond the nuclear agreement we want to make sure that Iran's nuclear program serves exclusively peaceful purposes," added the spokesman.

He noted that French President Emmanuel had proposed a supplementary agreement to solve the problem.

"We must look at this proposal carefully. The question is under what circumstances would Iran be prepared to let this process happen. We are in close and constructive exchange within the EU-3 and the U.S.," said the spokesman, according to Reuters.

His comments come as a May 12 deadline looms for the U.S. to decide on restoring U.S. sanctions on Tehran.

President Donald Trump, who has blasted the 2015 nuclear deal as “the worst deal ever negotiated”, in January decided to extend a waiver on nuclear sanctions that were imposed on Iran.

However, he made clear it was the last time he would extend the waiver and has given the European signatories the May 12 deadline to “fix the terrible flaws” of the deal.

On Tuesday, Trump met at the White House with Macron, who has been leading an effort by France, Britain and Germany to find those "fixes" to the deal that would satisfy Trump's objections.

"No one knows what I'm going to do on the 12th, although Mr. President, you have a pretty good idea," Trump told Macro at Tuesday's meeting, adding that if he does withdraw, he would look to see "if it will be possible to do a new deal with solid foundations, because this is a deal with decayed foundations."

Iranian leaders have warned Trump not to withdraw from the deal. Last week, Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif warned the United States there would be “unpleasant” consequences if it pulls out of the agreement.

On Tuesday, Zarif said that if the United States withdraws from the 2015 nuclear deal, his country will likely do so as well.

He added that any move by Trump to re-impose sanctions lifted under the deal would "amount to basically killing the deal."

"If the United States were to withdraw from the nuclear deal, the immediate consequence in all likelihood would be that Iran would reciprocate and withdraw," Zarif told The Associated Press, adding, "There won't be any deal for Iran to stay in."


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