No agreement between Israel and Poland on 'Holocaust Law'

Delegation cannot come to agreement regarding law, which would punish anyone indicating Polish responsibility during Holocaust war crimes.

Tzvi Lev,

Concentration Camp
Concentration Camp
Thinkstock

Israeli officials have not succeeded at compromising with a Polish delegation that arrived in Israel in order to come to an agreement over Poland's controversial "Holocaust Law".

Poland had sent a delegation to Israel in order to find a compromise over the law, which allows a sentence of up to three years in prison for anyone ascribing "responsibility or co-responsibility to the Polish nation or state for crimes committed by the German Third Reich".

The Polish law caused outrage in Israel, and has been criticized by the U.S. State Department, the French Foreign Ministry, and certain Jewish organizations. Stung by the heavy criticism, the Polish government announced last week that they would send a delegation to Israel in an attempt to resolve the dispute.

However, the Polish delegation was unable to find common ground with their Israeli counterparts.

According to a source, "There was an open dialogue of more than three hours between the Israeli team headed by Foreign Ministry Director-General Yuval Rotem and a team of diplomats and historians from Yad Vashem and the parallel Polish team headed by the deputy foreign minister".

The source added that after extensive negotiations, the two sides were not able to find a solution to the law.

The Director-General of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs also expressed his concern about the recent public atmosphere in Poland and the many manifestations of anti-Semitism and stressed that the Polish government must not tolerate anti-Semitic provocations.




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