Trump: Interview with special counsel 'unlikely'

Trump says it is unlikely he will have to sit down for interview with counsel probing alleged Russian interference in the 2016 election.

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Ben Ariel,

Donald Trump
Donald Trump
Reuters

U.S. President Donald Trump said on Wednesday it is “unlikely” he will have to sit down for an interview with special counsel Robert Mueller, who is probing alleged Russian interference in the 2016 election.

Trump repeatedly dodged whether he would submit to an interview with Mueller by citing his claim there was no collusion between his campaign and Russia during the 2016 presidential election.

“We’ll see what happens. When they have no collusion … it seems unlikely that you’d even have an interview,” he told reporters, according to The Hill.

Trump was speaking during a joint press conference alongside Norwegian Prime Minister Erna Solberg following a meeting at the White House.

Earlier this week it was reported that Mueller has raised the likelihood with Trump’s legal team that his office will seek an interview with the president.

NBC News reported that Trump's lawyers have discussed whether to ask for stipulations to the interview, such as answering questions in writing or signing an affidavit asserting the president's innocence.

Muller, a former FBI Director, was appointed by the Justice Department last year to oversee the federal investigation into alleged Russian interference in the 2016 election.

His appoint came after Attorney General Jeff Sessions recused himself from any involvement in the Russia investigation due to his role as a prominent campaign adviser and surrogate.

Trump has in the past argued that Mueller has hired "Hillary Clinton supporters" and people who worked for Clinton's 2016 White House bid to work on his investigation.

Indeed, reports emerged several months ago that a controversial dossier against Trump compiled ahead of the 2016 presidential election, which suggested then-candidate Trump colluded with the Russian government, was produced at the behest of the Clinton campaign and the Democratic National Committee.

On Wednesday, he again asserted that Democrats were behind the allegations of collusion between his campaign and Russia, also noting that such claims have hurt his presidency.

"There was absolutely no collusion, everybody knows it. I've been in office for 11 months, for 11 months they've had this phony cloud over this administration, over our government, and it has hurt our government," he said, according to The Hill.








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