'Trump's recognition of J'lem was the right response to Obama'

Rabbi of Efrat Shlomo Riskin saysTrump's recognition of Jerusalem was the inevitable response to the UN resolution Obama allowed to pass.

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Benny Toker,

Trump and Obama
Trump and Obama
Reuters

The Chief Rabbi of Efrat, Shlomo Riskin, praised President Donald Trump following his announcement of the planned relocation of the US embassy to Jerusalem and the formal recognition of Jerusalem as the capital city of Israel.

Speaking with Arutz Sheva this week, Riskin, who is currently visiting the US, described the enthusiastic reaction within the Orthodox Jewish community in the United States to the president’s declaration.

“This is a very exciting day for Orthodox Jews who care about the State of Israel and the Land of Israel – the feelings [here] are very positive. I commend President Trump for this move, which needed to happen years ago.”

Rabbi Riskin argued that President Trump’s declaration Wednesday was a response to then-President Barack Obama’s parting shot at Israel in December of 2016, when he ordered the US mission to the United Nations to abstain on United Nations Security Council Resolution 2334.

The resolution, adopted on December 23rd, declared all of eastern Jerusalem to be “occupied territory” and the Jewish presence there, including in the Old City of Jerusalem, to be illegal.

“The fact that [Trump’s] predecessor, and the United Nations, described the Western Wall as ‘occupied territory’ obliged President Trump to recognize Jerusalem. Israel has the right to choose its capital city, and it is Jerusalem – that’s just the reality.”

Trump’s historic move, said Rabbi Riskin, would force the Palestinian Authority to finally acknowledge Israel’s right to Jerusalem.

“The Palestinians have to accept our right to Jerusalem, and even to the Temple Mount, and it’s very important the President of the United States declares openly that Jerusalem belongs to the Jewish people.”

While Arab and European leaders warned Trump’s recognition of the Israeli capital would torpedo planned peace talks between Israel and the PA, Rabbi Riskin argued the move would help foster peace.

“This is also what will help promote peace, because we cannot continue with a dialogue that’s based on the Palestinian lie that the Temple [of Solomon] never existed and that the Temple Mount is a Palestinian holy site. That notion needed to be debunked once and for all.”








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