South Tel Aviv activist arrested

Israel Police arrest Sheffi Paz for coming to close to Supreme Court Chief Justice Hayut's home.

Arutz Sheva Staff, | updated: 00:01

Saturday night's demonstration
Saturday night's demonstration
Daniel Cohen

Sheffi Paz, an activist from southern Tel Aviv, was arrested during a protest against the infiltrators held outside of Supreme Court Chief Justice Esther Hayut's home.

"The protest's location was decided in coordination with the Shabak (Israel Security Agency)," an Israel Police spokesman said. "However, during the demonstration, protesters approached the Supreme Court Chief Justice's home."

"Police officers at the scene distanced the protesters from the area, allowing them to stand in nearby, where they could maintain eye contact with the Chief Justice's home. This area was determined to be a good alternative for the demonstration."

The protesters carried signs reading, "Esther Hayut, bring back sanity," "Take your hands off the Deposit Law," and "If there are no laws in southern Tel Aviv, there are no laws in your neighborhood, either."

The Deposit Law deducts 20% from infiltrators' salaries, in an attempt to encourage them to leave Israel of their own accord. The infiltrators receive this money when they agree to leave Israel.

The average infiltrator earns 6,632 NIS ($1890) per month, and 31.7% of infiltrators earn over 9,000 NIS ($2565) per month. One out of every ten infiltrators earns over 12,000 NIS ($3421) per month, and 3.4% earn over 15,000 NIS ($4276) per month, with some earning over 20,000 NIS ($5701) per month.

In 2016, the average Israeli salary rose to 9385 NIS ($2675) per month, and minimum wage rose in October to 5300 NIS ($1513) per month.

Prior to her arrest, Paz said, "We have come to remind Esther Hayut who is in charge and who the citizens are, and we came to tell her again that Jews have human rights, too. This week, the protocol for distancing these infiltrators was approved. In response, human rights organizations began comparing the transfer of infiltrators to Rwanda - a sovereign and thriving country - to transporting prisoners to Auschwitz."

"We are therefore demonstrating opposite the Supreme Court Chief Justice's home, and we call on her to take her hands off the Deposit Law. We demand she reject outright any petition which aims to harm the process of transferring these infiltrators to a third country.

"We expect the Supreme Court of Justice to remove itself from any discussion regarding the transfer policies, which are under the jurisdiction of lawmakers. The Supreme Court should allow the government to do its job. Esther Hayut must put an end to the African ghetto being built on the remnants of our lives.

"The State of Israel did not ask our permission to dump tens of thousands of infiltrators on us, and we are not asking the State's permission to demonstrate outside places which are 'symbols of rulership,' or outside any other institution. When the issue of the infiltrators is solved, we will agree to cease our protests outside the Supreme Court's 'symbol of rulership.'"

Also participating in the demonstration were activists from the Zionist organization Im Tirtzu. The activists called on the Supreme Court to cease discrimination against the residents of southern Tel Aviv.

Im Tirtzu CEO Matan Peleg said, "This is the eleventh demonstration we are holding in protest of the Supreme Court's dictatorship. We have come to remind the Supreme Court Chief Justice, and all of the Supreme Court's justices, that Israel's citizens are not invisible, and that Israelis also have human and civil rights."

"The Israeli government is thankfully in the process of closing the Holot detention facility. It's time to end the Supreme Court's dictatorship. Every citizen of Israel is like the residents of southern Tel Aviv. It's time we had a proper Israeli Supreme Court."

The demonstrations are held to protest the Supreme Court's refusal to deal with nearly 40,000 African infiltrators.

These illegal infiltrators, many of whom receive National Insurance benefits which Israelis have taken off their salaries, have caused a significant rise in crime, making life in southern Tel Aviv unbearable for residents.

Their children, "anchor babies," take over Jewish kindergartens and receive state-of-the-art facilities at residents' expense.




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