'Fear of US reaction delayed bill repealing Disengagement'

Coalition Chairman says bill canceling Disengagement Law in northern Samaria was delayed because Israel fears US response.

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Tzvi Lev,

'Because of the US.' David Bitan
'Because of the US.' David Bitan
Miriam Alster/Flash 90

Coalition Chairman MK David Bitan (Likud) clarified on Sunday that the bill canceling the Disengagement Law in northern Samaria was shelved due to fears over a potential negative reaction from the United States.

Political commentators had assumed that the bill had been delayed as payback for the Jewish Home party's objection to the 'French Law' banning police investigations into a sitting prime minister.

The proposed bill would repeal the Disengagement Law and allow freedom of movement for Jews in the evicted communities of Homesh, Sa-Nur, Ganim, and Kadim.

The bill was signed by Coalition Chairman MK David Bitan (Likud), who announced several days ago that the Prime Minister was giving a green light to the approval of the move, together with the head of the Shomron Regional Council, Yossi Dagan, who was expelled from Sa-Nur during the Disengagement.

However, sources within the Likud announced last week that the bill would not reach the Ministerial Committee on Legislation on Sunday as expected. A senior source within the Knesset told Arutz Sheva that Ministers would vote on the bill in the Committee on Sunday despite the Likud's opposition. "If the Likud wants to torpedo the legislation then they should do it under their own name and not blame the Americans," he said

Bitan said that the Greater Jerusalem Law was also delayed for fear of blowback from the Trump administration. The law was frozen Saturday night by Netanyahu, who said that he wanted more "diplomatic preparations" with the American government. However, reports on Friday said the Trump administration will not oppose the law.

The law, if passed, would expand the municipal borders of Jerusalem to include the city of Maaleh Adumim to the east, which is currently home to nearly 38,000 Israelis. In addition, the town of Givat Zeev to the northwest, the city of Beitar Illit to the south, the town of Efrat, and other communities in Gush Etzion would all be incorporated into Jerusalem.








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