Expectant mother, baby saved on eve of Rosh Hashana

Woman rushed to hospital with preeclampsia. Baby delivered 1 and a half months early.

Arutz Sheva Staff,

Mother and baby (illustration)
Mother and baby (illustration)
Flash 90

A 40-year-old woman from the Golan Heights was rushed to Ziv Medical Center in Tzfat just before the start of the Rosh Hashana holiday last Wednesday. The woman, who was 32 weeks pregnant and whose water had already broken, had high blood pressure and was believed to have been suffering from preeclampsia, a potentially fatal pregnancy disorder.

The woman was examined by the medical staff and rushed to the operating room in order to deliver the baby as soon as possible.

After the birth, the woman was treated in the Intensive Care Unit for 48 hours, during which she was anesthetized, placed on a respirator, and treated with medication. Following the comprehensive 48 hour treatment, the mother's life was saved and she was out of danger, She has since been transferred to the maternity ward in good condition.

The baby, born a month and a half prematurely and weighing 3.75 pounds, was immediately transferred to the neonatal intensive care unit, where he is still being treated and his condition is good.

Preeclampsia is a medical condition in which the mother's blood pressure rises, which can cause a range of symptoms, including organ damage. In extreme cases the condition can cause death to both the mother and the child.

The symptoms of preeclampsia are high blood pressure, a high level of protein in the urine and edema, mostly on the face and legs. In addition, symptoms include kidney dysfunction, liver dysfunction, headaches, blurred vision, cramps reminiscent of epilepsy, pulmonary edema, coagulation disorders, and other symptoms.

Preeclampsia is diagnosed through observation of several of these symptoms together. The condition can range from mild to life-threatening.

Treatment is carried out by quickly delivering the baby. Following the birth, supportive care is provided and the mother is kept under close supervision until all symptoms have ended.


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