Netanyahu to propose outline on Iran deal

Netanyahu intends to propose an outline for significant changes in the Iran nuclear deal when he meets Trump, report says.

Elad Benari,

Netanyahu and Trump (archive)
Netanyahu and Trump (archive)
Haim Zach/GPO

Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu intends to propose an outline for significant changes in the Iran nuclear deal when he meets U.S. President Donald Trump in New York this week, Channel 2 News reported on Saturday.

According to the report, the Prime Minister is not only going to speak out and warn against the danger from Iran, but also present a plan that will prevent Iran from becoming a nuclear power. Netanyahu also plans to discuss this topic in his address at the UN General Assembly.

The report did not provide details about Netanyahu’s plan, but did note that after many years in which every meeting with an American president was accompanied by tension and apprehension, this time Netanyahu will meet a sympathetic president and an administration that sees eye to eye on most of the issues.

One of the issues on which the sides agree appears to be the Iran deal, which Trump has continuously criticized, describing it as “the worst deal I’ve ever seen negotiated”.

Trump on Thursday slammed Iran for violating "the spirit" of the nuclear deal, saying again, "The Iran deal is one of the worst deals I've ever seen, certainly at a minimum the spirit of the deal is atrociously kept.”

"The Iran deal is not a fair deal to this country. It's a deal that should not have ever been made," he added.

Netanyahu has also been a vocal critic of the Iran deal. This week, during a visit to Argentina, he told Argentinian President Mauricio Macri, "Our position is straightforward - this is a bad deal. Either fix it or scrap it. This is Israel's position.”

Netanyahu has also expressed his concern over Iran and its proxies taking over areas vacated by the Islamic State (ISIS) group in Syria.

A recent Mossad assessment found that the Iranian regime is expanding its control across the Middle East through proxy forces in Syria, Lebanon, Iraq, and Yemen.




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