'We paid for the home, it's ours'

Residents of Machpela House in Hevron outraged after state says it will evict them from their homes.

Ido Ben Porat ,

Machpela House
Machpela House
Harhivi Mekom Oholech

Residents of the Machpela House in Hevron were outraged on Sunday, after the state of Israel told the Supreme Court that the Jews who entered the home last month would soon be evicted, despite having fully paid for the home.

15 families entered the Machpela House in late July, several weeks after Israeli security forces blocked Jews from entering both the Machpela House and the Rachel and Leah House in Hevron, which were bought by Jews several years ago.

"We bought it, we paid for it, it's ours. Now we inhabit the house," said one of the tenants on Sunday evening.

“For several years now we have been witnessing the tendentious behavior of the various government systems that are trying to prevent the development and expansion of the Jewish settlement in Hevron, in part by not allowing the occupancy of a building that was paid for in full as required by law,” said other residents of Machpela House.

"It is inconceivable that in the name of the law and other legal arguments, Jews will not be allowed to enter a building they purchased," the residents stressed. “The racism against Jews who bought a house in Hevron must stop. Everywhere else a Jew buys a house, pays for it, and goes to live there."

They noted that the Machpela House was purchased by the Harhivi Mekom Oholech organization, which intends to continue to "redeem" homes in Hevron and settle them with Jews.

"It would be appropriate for the government of Israel and the various government agencies to mobilize in full force for this Zionist act of redeeming the land with money. We call on the entire nation of Israel and the world to be partners with us in this Zionist enterprise," added the residents.

The comments came hours after the state, responding to a petition filed by Arabs against the Jewish families, said that in consultations held by the relevant state officials, Attorney General Avichai Mandelblit determined that the Jews who entered the house should leave.

Regarding the families' claim that they paid full price for the house, the response stated that "the Israeli company claiming rights in part to the building will be able to request temporary relief in the form of receiving a right to possession in part of the building."



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