Swastika drawn on NY church sharing space with synagogue

Church pastors discover swastika drawn under anti-hate sign.

JTA,

Definition of anti-Semitism
Definition of anti-Semitism
iStock

A swastika was drawn on a church in New York City that has shared space with a nearby synagogue.

The swastika was found at the bottom of the doorway of the Methodist Church of St. Paul & St. Andrew on Manhattan’s Upper West Side on Wednesday, according to the West Side Rag. The church as shared space with B’nai Jeshurun, a local synagogue, since 1991.

It appeared to be drawn with a felt-tip pen and was found as two of the church’s pastors were attending a local rally against white supremacy and hate. The swastika was drawn underneath a banner that said “hate has no home here” in multiple languages, including Hebrew.

“We obviously don’t know what motivated this, but we will continue to speak out against hate, hate speech and anti-Semitism, particularly in light of the recent events in Charlottesville and the approaching Jewish High Holy Days,” said a statement by the church’s senior pastor, Rev. K. Karpen, according to the West Side Rag.

Earlier this week, anti-Semitic slurs including “Jews die” and “Free USA” were found in a Michigan skate park, together with 15 swastikas. In Atlanta, four students were suspended and one expelled after they played a game of “Jews vs. Nazis” beer pong. In Canada, anti-Semitic graffiti was found scrawled at three Markham, Ontario, schools.








top