'I never knew one could redeem the Old City of Jerusalem'

The story of Irving Moskowitz, who was the first to redeem a building in the Old City of Jerusalem.

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Shuvu Banim Yeshiva
Shuvu Banim Yeshiva
Arutz Sheva

Rebuilding Jerusalem's ruins includes the redemption of lands and houses throughout the city. Arutz Sheva, together with Ateret Cohanim, continues the special project that focuses on renewal of Jewish presence in eastern Jerusalem, the Old City, and the village of Shiloah.

This time, we visit Yeshivat Shuvu Banim, which is a Breslov yeshiva today and in the past was called “Yeshivat Chayei Olam”.

“This was the spark that lit the revival of Jewish life here,” says Daniel Luria, Executive Director and spokesman for Ateret Cohanim. “Chayei Olam was one of the six yeshivot that were in the Old Jewish Quarter when there was a Jewish majority here.”

In 1978, Ateret Cohanim founder Matti Dan met Dr. Irving Moskowitz who, upon learning that Jerusalem can be reclaimed, helped cover the very first cheque to buy the building of the Shuvu Banim Yeshiva. Since that time, the Moskowitz family has been heavily involved in rebuilding Jerusalem.

People who take part in the redeeming of Jerusalem “think it’s a dream”, says Luria. “Today, people can actually buy back Jerusalem. It’s very real. All we need today is for the Jewish world to say, ‘I want a piece of the rock. I want to be close to the Temple Mount.’ It can be done. Moskowitz led the way. God opens up the door, and now all it takes is for Jews anywhere in the world to walk through the door and say, ‘I want a piece of that rock. I want to buy back Jerusalem.’”