Trump's son willing to speak to Senate

Donald Trump Jr. says he would be “happy” to speak to Senate Intelligence Committee about his meeting with Kremlin-linked Russian lawyer.

Ben Ariel ,

Donald Trump Jr.
Donald Trump Jr.
Reuters

Donald Trump Jr., son of U.S. President Donald Trump, on Monday said he would be “happy” to speak to the Senate Intelligence Committee about a meeting he attended last year with a Russian lawyer who promised to provide comprising information about then-Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton, The Hill reported.

“Happy to work with the committee to pass on what I know,” Trump Jr. tweeted.

He was responding to Sen. Susan Collins (R-Maine), who called on him to speak with the panel about the meeting, which took place during the 2016 presidential campaign.

It was reported on Sunday by The New York Times that Trump Jr., along with then-campaign chairman Paul Manafort and President Trump’s son-in-law Jared Kushner, met with Russian lawyer Natalia Veselnitskaya, who promised to provide damaging information on Clinton at the meeting.

Trump Jr. said in a statement to The Times on Sunday that he had met with Veselnitskaya, who has reported ties with the Kremlin, at the request of an acquaintance, but denied that he received any information on Clinton.

“After pleasantries were exchanged, the woman stated that she had information that individuals connected to Russia were funding the Democratic National Committee and supporting Ms. Clinton,” Trump Jr. said. “Her statements were vague, ambiguous and made no sense. No details or supporting information was provided or even offered. It quickly became clear that she had no meaningful information.”

He said they the discussion focused about American adoptions of Russian children.

“It became clear to me that this was the true agenda all along and that the claims of potentially helpful information were a pretext for the meeting.” Trump Jr. told the paper.

American intelligence agencies have concluded that Russian hackers and propagandists worked to tip the election toward Trump.

Trump initially rejected the CIA’s assessment that Russia carried out cyberattacks during the election campaign in order to sabotage Hillary Clinton's candidacy.

He later accepted the intelligence assessment but has rejected any direct involvement in the Russian hacking.

Veselnitskaya said in a statement on Saturday that “nothing at all about the presidential campaign” was discussed during the meeting.

She added that she had “never acted on behalf of the Russian government” and “never discussed any of these matters with any representative of the Russian government.”

Clinton has repeatedly blamed the Russian hacking for her election loss. In December, Clinton claimed that Putin ordered hacking attacks against her campaign and the Democratic National Committee “because he has a personal beef against me”.

She has also accused former FBI Director James Comey for renewing the probe into her use of a private email server of playing a role in her loss.




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