London's burning:
Skyscraper goes up in flames, trapping hundreds

Watch live: 24-story building, home to 120 families, suddenly goes up in flames. Firefighters battle blaze, attempt rescue of residents.

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David Rosenberg, | updated: 08:32

24-story London skyscrapper goes up in flames
24-story London skyscrapper goes up in flames
REUTERS

A high-rise apartment building in central London went up in flames early Wednesday morning, leaving the building on the verge of collapse, with hundreds of residents believed to be trapped inside.

Grenfell Tower, located in North Kensington, is a 24-story building, home to some 120 families.

More than 200 firefighters and 40 fire engines have been deployed to battle the blaze and attempt to rescue those trapped in the building. Dozens of ambulances and emergency medical teams have also been dispatched to the scene.

The London Ambulance Service has reported that 30 people have been evacuated from the building to local hospitals.

The fire started on the 23rd floor, and was first reported at 12:55 a.m. local time, and the cause of the blaze remains unknown.

Authorities say the building has been completely gutted by the fire, and that the remains of the building are at risk of collapse.

London Mayor Sadiq Khan called the fire a “Major incident”.

"Major incident declared at Grenfell Tower in Kensington," Khan tweeted.

Local council leader Nick Paget-Brown told Sky News that several hundred residents were likely in the tower when the fire started, and that authorities were working to ascertain precisely how many were trapped inside the burning building.

According to eyewitnesses, the fire quickly spread throughout the building, and remains out of control.

"There is a large fire which has spread to the other side,” a man named Reo told Sky News. “The building has completely gone. The fire is getting a lot worse, there is a lot of smoke, it is out of control."

Other witnesses said those trapped in the building could be heard screaming for help.

"More screams for help as the fire spreads to another side of the building," wrote Fabio Bebber on Twitter.

“I watched one person falling out, I watched another woman holding her baby out the window,” Jody Martin told the BBC. “ I was yelling everyone to get down and they were saying, ‘We can’t leave our apartments, the smoke is too bad in the corridors’.”








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