US government: Iran in compliance with nuclear deal

Trump administration certifies Iran is in compliance with the 2015 deal it signed with the world powers to rein in its nuclear program.

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President Donald Trump
President Donald Trump
Reuters

The Trump Administration certified that Iran is in compliance with the deal it signed with the world powers to rein in its nuclear program. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson on Tuesday sent a letter to Speaker of the House of Representatives Rep. Paul Ryan, R-Wis. certifying the compliance with the 2015 deal, which exchanges sanctions relief for a rollback of Iran’s nuclear program.

The State Department must update Congress on Iran’s compliance with the nuclear deal every 90 days. Tuesday’s was the first update for the Trump Administration.

The certification was the latest signal that President Donald Trump, who campaigned against the Iran deal and at times suggested he would scrap it, has as president adopted a more toned down posture related to the Iranian regime.

Trump imposed sanctions on Iranian individuals and businesses after Iran tested ballistic missiles earlier this year, but so had his predecessor, President Barack Obama a year earlier after a similar missile test. Trump has not otherwise been focused on Iran, although he launched a barrage of missiles at Iran’s ally, the Assad regime in Syria, after a chemical weapons attack on a rebel held area. Nevertheless, the letter to Ryan said Trump was ready to review the nuclear deal in light of its backing for terrorism.

“Iran remains a leading state sponsor of terror through many platforms and methods,” it said. Trump, it said, “has directed a National Security Council-led interagency review of the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action that will evaluate whether suspension of sanctions related to Iran pursuant to the JCPOA is vital to the national security interests of the United States.”

U.S. partners in the deal — including Britain, France, Germany, Russia and China — would likely balk at linking compliance with the deal with terrorism.

The letter did not say how long the evaluation would take. It added: “When the interagency review is completed, the administration looks forward to working with Congress on this issue.”

Last month, Trump and Israeli Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu spoke about the Iran nuclear deal in a phone call. “The two leaders spoke at length about the dangers posed by the nuclear deal with Iran and by Iran’s malevolent behavior in the region and about the need to work together to counter those dangers,” read a statement about the call from Netanyahu’s office.