Al-Aqsa preacher: If you don't like the muezzin, leave

Imam of the Al-Aqsa Mosque blasts proposed Israeli law that would prohibit mosques from using loudspeakers.

Dalit Halevi,

Al-Aqsa Mosque
Al-Aqsa Mosque
Nati Shohat/Flash 90

Sheikh Ikrima Sabri, head of the Supreme Muslim Council and the imam of the Al-Aqsa Mosque in Jerusalem, is rejecting a proposed Israeli law that would ban places of worship, such as mosques, from using loudspeakers.

The bill, proposed by MK Motti Yogev (Jewish Home), is designed to end the loud muezzin call to prayer played from mosque loudspeakers five times a day across the country.

The Ministerial Committee for Legislation is scheduled to vote on the law on Sunday.

In a sermon on Friday, Sabri attacked Israel’s attempt to ban the muezzin call, saying, "Israel has no right to intervene with the call of the muezzin, because it is contrary to freedom of worship."

"Anyone who is angered by the call of the muezzin, should leave (the country)," he declared.

In the same sermon, Sabri rejected the demand for Jewish prayer on the Temple Mount, saying it is "unacceptable".

"The Al-Aqsa mosque will not surrender to haggling and negotiations, and we will not give up on even one grain of earth," he declared.

The comments are in line with Sabri’s previous warnings with regards to Al-Aqsa.

In 2014, Sabri declared that Al-Aqsa was a “red line” for Arabs, adding, “We will not give up even one grain of earth (at the Al-Aqsa Mosque), since the Jews have no connection to it whatsoever.”


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