Trump outlines first 100 days in White House

In Gettysburg speech, Trump outlines first 100 days in White House and what he plans to do.

Chana Roberts,

Donald Trump
Donald Trump
Reuters

In his Gettysburg speech on Saturday, Republican candidate Donald Trump spoke about what he plans to do during his first 100 days in the White House, after a good part of the beginning of his speech was spent emphasizing the differences between himself and Democratic candidate Hillary Clinton.

According to Trump, the very fact that Clinton is running for president proves the system is rigged.

“She shouldn’t be allowed to run. She’s guilty of a very very serious crime. She should not be allowed to run. And just in that respect, I say it’s rigged. She should never have been allowed to run for the presidency based on what she did with emails and so many other things,” he said.

"Clinton isn't running against me, she's running against change," Trump said. "She's running against America's citizens, and against the voters. I never wanted to be a politician. I just wanted our America back."

He also spoke about those women who claim he sexually harassed them.

"Any woman who claims such things is lying in order to hurt my campaign. I'll sue them all after the elections," he said.

On the subject of the two million infiltrators America is dealing with, he said, "We'll stop immigration from terror-prone countries from which we can't properly vet candidates. For example, Syria."

"We accept thousands of migrants. I have no idea who they are, what they believe, or where they come from - and Clinton wants to increase the number of immigrants we accept. Islamic extremist terror is just around the corner. We need to be smart and tough. We can't let it happen. We're going to filter requests carefully."

Though Clinton seems to be doing better than Trump in polls and has a clear advantage over him in terms of experience in the workings of the White House, Trump has not given up hope and seems to be closing the gap between the two.

The symbolism of Trump's holding his "closing" speech in Gettysburg was not lost on supporters of either candidate.




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