How much does the post office pay for losing your iPhone?

Ofir Kokhavi's phone went missing and he was given the run-around for months - you won't believe his final compensation.

Ari Yashar,

iPhone (illustration)
iPhone (illustration)
Reuters

Many Israelis have long had a less than favorable opinion of the Israel Postal Company, but a new horror story would seem to justify their fears.

Ofir Kokhavi, a 24-year-old from Rishon Letzion, sent his iPhone to a friend in the US last December, reports Channel 2 on Sunday.

"There was a problem with the device that I bought in the United States. I still had a warranty on it, so I decided to send the iPhone to a friend who was in the US at the time so that he could repair it for me," Kokhavi explained.

However, after entrusting his expensive smartphone to the post office, they promptly lost all trace of it and gave him the run-around for several months as he tried to track it down.

"Around a month later, when the device didn't arrive, I started to clarify where the package was," revealed Kokhavi. "I got a letter saying that several details were missing in the shipment, I sent them the relevant details and asked for them to get back in touch with me."

"I also called five to six times and waited on the line each time around half-an-hour until there was an answer. Each time I was told that someone in charge would get back to me, but to this day no one has called me back."

Eventually the Postal Company decided it had to take action, and just this week Kokhavi received what the post office termed as "monetary compensation" for his phone that was lost.

"Several days ago I got a letter explaining that they don't know where the package is, and therefore they are including a check for the ridiculous total of 180 lowly shekels," he said, indicating an amount under $50.

In the letter was written, "in a clarification conducted due to the your contacting the postal management abroad, the traces of the mail in question were not located. Please accept an apology on the circumstances of the incident."

The exact amount of the attached check was 183 shekels, with 21 shekels ($5) of that amount being compensation for the shipping charges, leaving only 162 shekels (just over $42) in compensation for the brand new iPhone.

It turns out the paltry sum was the largest compensation the post office pays. 

The guarantee and compensation terms on the Israel Postal Company website specify that compensation will never exceed 163 shekels, with compensation for shipping charges coming in addition.

While the Postal Company admitted its mistake, it clarified that it does not intend to reimburse Kokhavi any more for the massive loss he suffered due to their failure to deliver his package.

"The incident was thoroughly checked and the customer received the maximal compensation in accordance with the protocols of the company," it said in a statement.








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