Feminist MK sees male conspiracy behind aging

Labor MK Yechimovich is upset that a model's contract has been terminated because of her fading looks.

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Gil Ronen,

Zorer in 2009
Zorer in 2009
Miriam Alster / Flash 90

MK Shelly Yechimovich (Labor) appeared to point to aging as part of a vast patriarchal conspiracy Monday, in a Facebook post.

Yechimovich reacted to news that model and actress Ayelet Zorer was suing Israeli fashion firm Golbary for cutting off its contract with her after 11 years in which she served as its house model.

According to the lawsuit, Zorer, 46, had two years remaining in her contract with Golbary when the owner, Moshe Golbary, suddenly told her that he was replacing her with model Esty Ginsburg, who is 25. She had been making $60,000 annually for the job.

Zorer is suing Golbary for 460,000 shekels. She claimed that the firm is currently targeting women aged 25-plus and that Golbary told her that her "looks had changed for the worse."

Yechimovich, who rose to fame and power as a militant feminist journalist, took Zorer's side. Zorer, she argued, had not been hired "just as a sweet and beautiful 18-year-old" from the outset, but also because of her personality and fame, something Yechimovich labeled "brandness." These qualities, she argued, are due to Zorer's talent.

The fashion world's standards of youth, slimness and height are tough ones, said the politician. "To look at Zorer and think that someone thinks 'her appearance has changed for the worse' adds fuel to this fire."

Her beauty "has not really changed for the worse," she argued. It's just that for Golbary, her age is something that is "beyond his comprehension." She noted that Golbary used to own a company that specialized in raising horses for beauty shows. "Women are not horses," she concluded.

Yechimovich announced two days ago that she will probably compete against MK Yitzhak Herzog for the position of Labor Party chair. The post about Zorer could be an attempt to reignite the support of her feminist power base ahead of the confrontation. Over the years since her journalistic days on public radio, she has put less stress on feminism and more on other aspects of her socialist agenda.