Months Later, Terrorists' Homes Remain Standing

A blame game has erupted over the unheeded demolition orders for the homes of the Har Nof terrorists, car attack terrorist - but why?

Tova Dvorin,

Ghassan (L) and Uday Abu-Jamal
Ghassan (L) and Uday Abu-Jamal
Courtesy of Channel 10

Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu ordered the demolition of the homes of the terrorists responsible for the brutal Har Nof synagogue massacre in November and a "car terror" attack that same month - but none of the orders have been carried out, one report reveals Sunday. 

In December, the Supreme Court upheld the demolition orders for the Ghassan and Uday Abu Jamal, the two terrorists who carried out the massacre on a Har Nof synagogue in Jerusalem, after a petition against the demolition was categorically rejected in the wake of the atrocity. 

Netanyahu also ordered the demolition of the home of terrorist Ibrahim Al-Akari, who rammed his car into a Jerusalem light rail station that month before leaving the vehicle and stabbing bystanders. Al-Akari was shot dead by security forces at the scene. 

Neither have been carried out, however, Channel 2 revealed Sunday - and the various organizations are entrenched in a blame game over why.

The IDF, which issued the demolition order, argues that the responsibility for carrying out the destruction is the Israel Police's, whereas the Israel Police claims that it will not execute those orders "under any circumstances," according to the news agency. 

In the slew of attacks on Israeli Jews during October and November, several demolition orders have been issued - and the only one carried out was, in fact, executed by the IDF. The IDF razed the flat of the Shaludi family on November 19, 2014; Abdelrahman Shaludi was responsible for the first "car rampage" attack in Jerusalem on October at a light rail station. A young woman and a 3-month-old baby girl were murdered in that attack. 

A source involved in the current demolition process noted to Channel 2 that the problem is a matter of lack of specificity; the political system leaves some room for the IDF to decide that a demolition could harm Israel's security, e.g. spark rioting or other unrest, and thus can quietly veto the order by calling for an unspecified delay. 

The IDF and the Israel Police have not responded to requests for comment. 


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