'Soldiers Go Home and Hug Their Moms, But I Can't'

Seven months after aliyah, Meir Ginsburg explains to Arutz Sheva how he fell in love with Israel and decided to be an infantry soldier.

Yishai Karov, Ari Yashar,

Meir Ginsburg
Meir Ginsburg
IDF Spokesperson Unit

The IDF's infantry Kfir Brigade will hold its swearing in ceremony on Thursday night at the Kotel (Western Wall) in Jerusalem - one of the soldiers taking part will be Meir Ginsburg, who just a mere seven months ago made aliyah (immigration) to Israel.

Ginsburg spoke to Arutz Sheva about his decision to make come home to the Jewish state and enlist into an elite infantry unit.

At his Jewish high school abroad Ginsburg was not taught about Zionism, but one visit to the Holy Land on a free ten-day trip with the Taglit-Birthright Israel program was enough to make him fall in love.

"I never studied about Zionism, but I read the stories about Israel and the wars, and I decided that's what I need to do," said Ginsburg.

However, Ginsburg's parents weren't particularly overjoyed over his desire to leave the family and set off on his own to Israel, where he would enlist in a combat position in the IDF.

"My mom was in shock but after I made clear that that's what I intended to do, she said: if you're happy then I'm happy," he recalled.

As experienced by many lone soldiers - those serving in the IDF without the benefit of having their family - Ginsburg has been forced to deal with several challenges.

He notes that "soldiers go home and gives their moms hugs, and I can't," but he is looking forward to seeing his parents in Israel when he completes his beret march, a massive final test of endurance taken before completing infantry training.

And in the meantime his commanders are doing their best to help him navigate the difficulties of serving in the army alone, just seven months after making his home in Israel.


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