Hotovely on Primaries Loss: This Isn't the End

MK Tzipi Hotovely, who failed to secure a realistic spot on the Likud’s election list, says she plans to continue her public mission.

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Elad Benari, Canada,

Tzipi Hotovely
Tzipi Hotovely
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MK Tzipi Hotovely, who is likely headed out of the Knesset after failing to secure a realistic spot on the Likud’s election list, on Friday thanked her supporters and clarified, “This isn’t the end”.

“The most important thing for me after receiving the results of the elections is to say thank you. Thank you for your accompaniment and trust throughout,” wrote Hotovely on her Facebook page.

“As a public servant I felt as though I was your messenger. And you chose me, supported me, worked for my success, and without you I could have not carried out my mission.

“Public life has its ups and downs. I accept the will of the voter and wish the Likud and [Prime Minister Binyamin] Netanyahu that they win and lead the next government,” said Hotovely.

“I entered politics after Netanyahu invited me to join the ranks of the Likud. Over these years we created a new thinking in many fields. I had the pleasure to serve the country in the Israeli Knesset. I thank G-d for the privilege to be there.

“I'm not retiring from my public mission, and this certainly isn’t the end,” she stressed.

Hotovely, who currently serves as Deputy Transportation Minister as well as Deputy Minister of Science and Technology, had been vying with former MK Avi Dichter for the 20th spot on the Likud list, which is the last one that is considered realistic, out of the spots that are currently being decided. Spots 21 to 25 are reserved for people who will represent districts or sectors, or who will be appointed by the prime minister.

She was leading over Dichter in the initial hours but Dichter later took the lead and maintained it.

Deputy Knesset Speaker MK Moshe Feiglin is out of the realistic zone for election to the 20th Knesset as well, and his camp has strongly hinted the primaries were rigged in order to push him out of the Knesset.

Feiglin has been spearheading the struggle for allowing Jewish prayer in the Temple Mount, against the wishes of Netanyahu, who sees the struggle as recklessly endangering stability in the Middle East. 

(Arutz Sheva’s North American desk is keeping you updated until the start of Shabbat in New York. The time posted automatically on all Arutz Sheva articles, however, is Israeli time.)








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