Biden Slams 'Malarkey' of Bad Iran Deal

US VP claims Iran won't get the bomb on his watch, denies division with Israel on the topic, after talks extended again and US softening.

Arutz Sheva Staff,

Joe Biden
Joe Biden
Reuters

US Vice President Joe Biden Saturday dismissed the "malarkey" about efforts to reach a nuclear deal with Iran, and reassured Israel its security would not be put at risk.

"There's absolutely no daylight, none, between us and the Israelis on the question of Israel's security," Biden told the pro-Israel Saban Forum in Washington. "But as friends we have an obligation to speak honestly with one another. To talk about, not avoid the tactical disagreements we have."

Israel has warned that America is in danger of sealing a bad deal with Iran that would leave it with breakout capability to quickly create an atomic bomb.

Trying to minimize the debate over the possibility of nuclear war, Biden said "let's not make more of what are normal disagreements between friends than warrants." He insisted that "every aspect of" the Iran policy had been "discussed in detail" with Israel.

However, US President Barack Obama was revealed to have sent a secret letter to Iranian Supreme Leader Ayatollah Khamenei in October without informing Israel, in which he called for cooperation against Islamic State (ISIS) and a nuclear agreement.

Biden urged "please let's keep whatever disagreements we have in perspective, because...they don't go to the essence of who we are as Americans and who Israelis are."

"There's been a lot of malarkey about our position on Iran. So let me state it absolutely clearly," Biden said. "We will not let Iran acquire a nuclear weapon, period, period. End of discussion. It will not happen on our watch."

And yet world powers led by America last month extended talks for the second time, as Iran is demanding to retain enough centrifuges to build 38 atomic bombs every year.

"A diplomatic solution that puts significant and verifiable constraints on Iran's nuclear program represents the best and most sustainable chance to ensure that America, Israel, the entire Middle East will never be menaced by a nuclear-armed Iran," Biden insisted.

Forty-three US Senators last month wrote to Obama expressing their alarm at reports he intends to bypass the Congress and force through a deal with Iran, fears which are heightened by revelations from the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) showing Iran is not abiding by interim conditions in refusing to answer questions on the military aspects of its nuclear program. 

AFP contributed to this article.




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