Kahlon's Party to Focus on Cost of Living, Housing

'The concept of 'monopoly' needs to disappear,' former Likud minister states, in remarks over plans for his new political party.

Tova Dvorin,

Moshe Kahlon
Moshe Kahlon
Flash90

Former Likud MK and political candidate Moshe Kahlon has outlined some of his new party's platform, Walla! News reports Wednesday - one focused on economic development and fixing the cost of living crisis. 

"We need a new framework with fresh faces, who are determined, who come to serve the public, not to serve their own power," Kahlon stated Wednesday, at a meeting with students of Economics at the University of Haifa. "That is the model of the day, my friends - and I was planning to introduce it in the near future."

"Today, unfortunately, what is happening here is that a huge part of the public is not sure what would happen to its children: will they be here? Will they leave? Will they be able to marry, have children?" Kahlon stated. "We are in an economic reality of a lack of competition, of monopolies and cartels. Until this basic problem will not be solved - we will continue to deteriorate."

He detailed reasons for the situation, including the fact that the state owns 94% of land in Israel.

"Until it is resolved we will continue to hear about housing problems," he insisted. "The concept of 'monopoly' must disappear forever." Kahlon added that, to this end, free reign should be given to brokers to compete over land tenders, which could drive down the cost of housing overall. 

The former Likudnik has stated on more than one occasion that the party platform - like Finance Minister Yair Lapid's Yesh Atid party's during the last elections - would revolve around the cost of living issue, as well as the housing crisis.

As of reports in October and November, Kahlon's party has already received a measure of support. Shas Chairman MK Aryeh Deri  has voiced his willingness to work with Kahlon in the next Knesset, and his declaration Wednesday follows a Channel 2 poll Tuesday suggesting that his new party - which has yet to be named - would gain 10 seats in the 20th Knesset, if the elections were held today. 

As for what Kahlon's new party's stance would be on other issues such as foreign policy, the former minister last April complained that the "extreme right" had taken over Likud, and commented that he missed the "old Likud" he claimed had focused on social issues.




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