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Watch: Taking Back King David's Tomb With Prayer

In response to regular Mass services in Tomb compound and even Tomb room, Jews block priests from further breach of status quo.
By Shimon Cohen, Ari Yashar
First Publish: 6/11/2014, 8:16 AM

Following the Christian Mass services at the David's Tomb Compound on Sunday, and in the very room of King David's Tomb marker on Monday, Jews took back the holy site later on Monday in a protest prayer at the "Room of the Last Supper," preventing further breaches of the status quo.

Video from the protest, which included roughly 30 Jews, among them MK Moshe Feiglin (Likud), can be seen here: 

At one point in the film, a priest in white robes decorated in crosses can be seen leaving the room.

The video was uploaded with the words: "you can see how the Christians enter, but realize this time they won't be able to commit their opportunism and continue their seizure of control over the site."

Israeli officials have continuously denied a transfer of the holy site to the Vatican. The Minister of Public Security denied a change in status quo, and similarly the Chief Sephardic Rabbi and Israel's Ambassador to the Vatican have denied any deal.

However, Arutz Sheva received videos, pictures and testimony verifying that the Tomb Compound has been the site of Mass services on a regular basis since Pope Francis's visit two weeks ago.

As part of that process, Jewish worshipers were evicted from the King David's Tomb room on Monday by Israeli police, who guarded Christians as they held Mass in the very room where the tomb is said to be located. 

The change constitutes a real threat to Jewish prayer rights at the site.

Rabbi Avraham Goldstein, dean of the Diaspora Yeshiva, told Arutz Sheva in May that Jews will be prevented from entering the holy site altogether due to the Mass services, given that Jewish law forbids using a building used for idol-worship - a category which Catholic worship, with its use of effigies, falls under according to Jewish law.