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Iran Upset Over Argentine Court's Nixing of AMIA Massacre Probe

Iran expresses dissatisfaction over Argentine court's ruling that an agreement to probe the AMIA bombing as “unconstitutional.”
By Elad Benari, Canada
First Publish: 5/16/2014, 9:01 PM

Protest by relatives of AMIA victims (file)
Protest by relatives of AMIA victims (file)
Reuters

Iran on Friday expressed dissatisfaction over a decision by an Argentine court declaring an agreement with Tehran to probe the 1994 bombing of a Buenos Aires Jewish center as “unconstitutional.”

"The Argentinean court is denying a suitable opportunity to find the truth behind the AMIA disaster and resolve pertinent bilateral issues," Marzieh Afkham, a spokeswoman for the Iranian foreign ministry, said in a statement quoted by AFP.

In early 2013, Argentina's congress approved, at the request of the executive branch, an agreement with Tehran to form a truth commission to investigate the bombing.

The attorney general in the case, Alberto Nisman, had said the agreement constituted an "undue interference of the executive branch in the exclusive sphere of the judiciary."

Argentina charges that Hezbollah, the Lebanese Shiite movement, carried out the attack under orders from Iran, which Tehran denies.

Since 2006, Argentine courts have demanded the extradition of eight Iranians, including former president Akbar Hashemi Rafsanjani, former defense minister Ahmad Vahidi and Mohsen Rabbani, Iran's former cultural attache in Buenos Aires.

The accord between the two countries was strongly rejected by organizations representing the 300,000 members of Argentina's Jewish community, the largest in Latin America.

Iranian President Hassan Rouhani was found to have been on the special Iranian government committee that plotted the 1994 bombing, according to an indictment by the Argentine government prosecutor investigating the case.

The AMIA bombing is considered the deadliest terror attack in Argentina’s history, killing 85 and wounding hundreds more.

(Arutz Sheva’s North American Desk is keeping you updated until the start of Shabbat in New York. The time posted automatically on all Arutz Sheva articles, however, is Israeli time.)