Daily Israel Report
Show More

OpEds


Frustrated South Tel Aviv Residents Call to Oust Infiltrators

Resident speaks to Arutz Sheva on the crime rate, why judges should 'see for themselves' the 'intolerable' security situation in the city.
By Benny Toker
First Publish: 4/6/2014, 7:39 AM

Shantytown in South Tel Aviv
Shantytown in South Tel Aviv
Flash90

South Tel Aviv residents have called on High Court of Justice judges to visit their crime-ridden neighborhoods, after a dramatic court hearing on the fate of infiltrators flooding the city convened last week. 

Attorney Navon Katzav, a South Tel Aviv resident. spoke to Arutz Sheva on Sunday morning to reveal the true extent of the violence he suffers from in his neighborhood. 

"The agenda of [leftist] organizations is very clear: they want to keep infiltrators in the State of Israel," Katzav stated. "I call on judges from the High Court of Justice itself to take a tour of our neighborhood and see for themselves, to understand firsthand how the situation is intolerable, how it's inconceivable that taxpayers are terrified of infiltrators roaming their streets." 

Infiltrators are credited with causing crime to skyrocket in South Tel Aviv, where they constitute a majority of the population - and where violent crime is now several times more prevalent than average for the major city. 

Residents of working-class neighborhoods say they have been suffering from endless harassment, fear and violence perpetrated by the many illegal Eritrean and Sudanese infiltrators who enter Israel to find employment and come to live in their neighborhoods. 

A petition to oust the infiltrators initially reached the Court in December. However, controversy regarding new laws preventing illegal immigration - including a smear campaign against Israel's handling of the 60,000 migrants run by NGOs, leftist groups, and the UN - postponed judgement on the petition while Israel repaired damage to its image. 

Katzav added that he hoped that the Court would ultimately choose justice.

"If this is truly a humanitarian issue and someone actually needs asylum, then he should stay," Katzav stated, "but most of the people we are talking about here just came here to make money, and it's time to send them home."