Daily Israel Report

Livni: Discrimination in Companies Under Your Control

Livni sends letters to MKs alleging systemic discrimination in several large companies and organizations. Among them: MDA, Yad V'Shem.
By Tova Dvorin
First Publish: 11/4/2013, 12:14 AM

Tzipi Livni
Tzipi Livni
Flash 90

Justice Minister Tzipi Livni (HaTnua) has dispatched letters to 9 ministers demanding corrective action for discriminatory policies allegedly held by major government-backed organizations for not employing enough Ethiopian immigrants and Druze. 

The accused organizations include Magen David Adom (MDA), the Hebrew Academy of Language, Yad V'Shem, the National Road Safety Authority and the Second Authority for Television and Radio. 

According to Israeli law, government-backed organizations with more than 50 employees must employ a number of workers from minority populations, ranked by their demographic proportions to the general population. In 2013, this is 1.5% for Ethiopians, and 1.7% for Druze.

"Data received by the Ministry of Justice during the first quarter of this year has found that membership of minority groups on the committees and staff of these organizations is significantly lower than their proportion to the general population," Livni claims. "The problem is even more acute when it comes to academic professions and senior lecturer positions [in State universities]."  

Livni concludes her statements by saying that "there is absolutely no room in the government for discrimination - especially ethnic discrimination"  and by calling on the ministers to "do their job" and to enforce the quotas, which have been mandated to prevent the problem. 

It is unclear why Livni has chosen to publish the data now, in the third quarter, while the Knesset has been in the midst of discussing a number of monumental bills regarding religious ceremonies and freedoms, national security, and other pressing issues. Livni has been on somewhat of a rampage since last week, when opposition was raised by Bayit Yehudi and others against Tuesday's release of 26 convicted terrorists back into Judea and Samaria, as a supposed precondition for negotiations with Palestinian Arabs.