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      New Egyptian Cabinet Sworn-In

      The first Egyptian Cabinet since the overthrow of president Mohammed Morsi sworn in, Brotherhood rejects it.
      By Elad Benari
      First Publish: 7/17/2013, 5:47 AM

      Riots in Egypt
      Riots in Egypt
      Reuters

      The first Egyptian Cabinet since the overthrow of Islamist president Mohammed Morsi was sworn in on Tuesday, as the Muslim Brotherhood from which the ousted president hails rejected its legitimacy.

      The cabinet lineup does not include any members from Islamist groups or parties, even from the Salafist Nour party, which supported the military roadmap for transition, reported Al Arabiya.

      Army chief Abdel Fattah al-Sisi was appointed first deputy prime minister and minister of defense in the government headed by liberal economist Hazem al-Beblawi.

      Mohammed Ibrahim, the interior minister who was appointed by Morsi, remains in his post, in charge of the police. Nabil Fahmy, who was Egypt’s ambassador to the United States from 1999-2008, becomes foreign minister.

      Interim President Adly Mansour named three women in the Cabinet, taking the powerful ministries of information and health as well as the environment ministry. The Cabinet has 33 members, not including Beblawi.

      Beblawi said last week he would offer the Muslim Brotherhood ministerial positions in the transitional government in Egypt, but the Islamist group refused. A spokesman for the movement, Gehad El-Haddad, told AFP, “We don’t recognize its legitimacy or its authority.”

      The swearing-in of the new government came only hours after clashes between police and Islamist supporters of Morsi left seven protesters dead in the worst outbreak of violence in a week.

      Protests and clashes have been a regular occurrence in Egypt since the military ousted Morsi earlier this month after days of protests calling on him to go. In one of the deadliest incidents last week, 51 people died and 435 were injured in clashes between the Egyptian army and pro-Morsi protesters at the Republican Guard headquarters.

      Following the deadly clashes, the Muslim Brotherhood called for an “uprising” in Egypt.