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Clinton Expected to Make Full Recovery, Doctors Say

Top U.S. diplomat Hillary Clinton is suffering from a blood clot in a vein in her head but should make a full recovery.
By Elad Benari
First Publish: 1/1/2013, 4:17 AM

Hillary Clinton
Hillary Clinton
Flash 90

Top U.S. diplomat Hillary Clinton is suffering from a blood clot in a vein in her head but should make a full recovery, doctors said Monday, according to AFP.

A routine scan on Sunday had revealed "that a right transverse sinus venous thrombosis had formed," doctors Lisa Bardack, of Mount Kisco Medical Group, and Gigi El-Bayoumi, of George Washington University, said in a statement quoted by AFP.

They described it as "a clot in the vein that is situated in the space between the brain and the skull behind the right ear. It did not result in a stroke, or neurological damage."

Clinton was admitted to the New York Presbyterian Hospital on Sunday following the discovery and is being treated with blood thinners to dissolve the clot. She will be released "once the medication dose has been established."

"In all other aspects of her recovery, the secretary is making excellent progress and we are confident she will make a full recovery. She is in good spirits, engaging with her doctors, her family, and her staff," the doctors added.

Her top aide, Philippe Reines, said Sunday the Secretary of State would stay in the hospital for some 48 hours after being admitted so she could be monitored while on the anti-coagulant drugs.

The globe-trotting diplomat has not been seen in public after succumbing to a stomach virus on returning from a trip to Europe on December 7.

It's a rare absence for the most popular member of President Barack Obama's cabinet, who has been a highly-visible and loyal supporter of his foreign policy agenda, traveling almost a million miles during four years in office.

But Clinton, 65, has made it clear she intends to step down in the coming weeks, once Senator John Kerry, tapped by President Barack Obama to replace her, is confirmed by the Senate.

Clinton fell ill with the bad stomach bug virus on her return from her trip to Prague, Brussels, Dublin and Belfast, which caused her to become dehydrated. She fainted and suffered a concussion.

Clinton's lengthy absence from public life had sparked claims from some of her fiercest critics that she was faking illness to avoid testifying before lawmakers investigating a deadly attack on a U.S. mission in Libya.

The September 11 assault on the US mission in eastern Benghazi, in which the U.S. ambassador and three other American officials were killed, sparked a political firestorm in the United States. A subsequent State Department inquiry found that security at the mission was "grossly inadequate."

A Senate report released Monday confirmed that the decision to keep the U.S. embassy in Benghazi open despite increasingly dangerous threats and the knowledge that the mission's security detail would be inadequate to deal with the threats was a "grievous mistake," resulting in the deaths of the four Americans.