Daily Israel Report

Iran Offers West a Compromise Over its Nuclear Program

Iran’s Foreign Minister: Recognize our right to enrich uranium and we will limit the amount of enrichment.
By Elad Benari, Canada
First Publish: 10/7/2012, 8:55 PM

Iranian Foreign Minister Ali Akbar Salehi
Iranian Foreign Minister Ali Akbar Salehi
Reuters

Iran’s Foreign Minister is offering the West a compromise regarding his country’s nuclear program.

In an interview with the German magazine Der Spiegel which will be published on Monday and of which excerpts were published Sunday, Ali Akbar Salehi said that Iran would be willing to limit its uranium enrichment if the international community agrees to recognize its right to have nukes.

The Iranian minister stressed his country's right to enrich uranium for peaceful purposes, adding that no one has proof that Tehran has conducted nuclear research for "other purposes."

At the same time, Salehi expressed his country’s willingness for a “deal” with the West.

“If our right to enrich uranium is recognized, we will limit the amount of enrichment," said Salehi, adding, “However, Iran will need to receive the fuel supply it needs other countries.”

The New York Times reported on Friday that Iran offered a “nine-step plan” to defuse tensions over its unsupervised nuclear program, but the compromise offer was rejected by the United States.

American officials reported said the proposal required too much from the West, including a complete end to sanctions.

The proposal would see the U.S. and Europe gradually end sanctions while Iran would end work at one of two sites where uranium is being enriched to 20 percent. Once all sanctions have ended, Iran would “suspend” work on medium-enriched uranium at the second site.

On Saturday, however, Iran's top negotiator, Saeed Jalili, dismissed the report as "baseless".

Meanwhile, Iran’s economy has been feeling the sanctions imposed on the Islamic Republic. The Iranian rial lost more than half its value in a week, causing local merchants to riot and scuffles to break out in Tehran.

(Arutz Sheva’s North American Desk is keeping you updated until the start of Shmini Atzeret and Simchat Torah in New York. The time posted automatically on all Arutz Sheva articles, however, is Israeli time.)