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A Few Hundred South Sudanese 'Going Home'

A few hundred South Sudanese citizens have signed an agreement to return to their native land and are set to fly back home on Sunday.
By Chana Ya'ar
First Publish: 6/13/2012, 10:38 AM

Sudanese migrant in Israel
Sudanese migrant in Israel
Flash 90

A few hundred South Sudanese citizens have signed an agreement to return to their native land following a nationwide crackdown by the government on illegal entry into the country.

About 280 South Sudanese citizens signed the documents between Tuesday and Wednesday as police conduct a sweep through Israel, searching for those who had entered the country through the southern border illegally. Overnight Tuesday, another 100 illegal entrants were arrested in a sweep by police, dubbed Operation “Going Home” (“Chozrim HaBayita”).

Most of the arrests were made in the cities of Tel Aviv and Eilat. The Negev cities of Arad and Be'er Sheva, both of which have been inundated with African illegals for several years, were left untouched.

On Sunday, a direct flight is scheduled to bring nearly 200 of the illegals back to their home country of South Sudan, which is now an independent nation and is no longer considered unsafe.

A delegation of immigration officials from South Sudan is set to meet this week with Israeli officials from the Immigration and Population Authority. The two teams are expected to coordinate the repatriation of the South Sudanese citizens who will be flying home, most of whom made the decision to return prior to the start of Operation Going Home.

A second plane is expected to fly some 200 of the South Sudanese illegal entrants back to their native land in mid-July, authorities said.

According to the government sources, the South Sudanese citizens who are returning willingly are to receive job training in Israel. In addition, Israel is conducting talks with South Sudan over the possibility of providing further job training in the African nation once the deportees return. Some of the possible vocational skills to be taught may include agricultural training, according to the sources.