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Remand Extended for 5 'Price Tag' Suspects in Jerusalem

Five "price tag" suspects arrested Wednesday in Jerusalem have been remanded until Friday.
By Chana Ya'ar
First Publish: 12/15/2011, 4:12 PM

'Price Tag' vandalism (illustrative)
'Price Tag' vandalism (illustrative)
Flash 90

Five suspected "price tag" vandals will remain in a Jerusalem jail at least for one more day. The local Magistrates Court ruled Thursday to extend their remand until Friday in order to allow police time to gather evidence.

The five are charged in connection with a number of "price tag" incidents around the capital, as well as in Judea and Samaria.

They, along with one other individual, were arrested during a  violent confrontation after police reportedly broke into an apartment in the Kiryat Moshe neighborhood where they were staying.

All are reportedly under age 18, and are suspected of conspiring to commit a crime and obstructing police officers.

The sixth youth was transferred to the Judea and Samaria police district, where he has been charged with other "price tag" incidents.

All six are residents of Judea and Samaria, who were banned by police from returning to their homes. Police arrived at the apartment unannounced Wednesday afternoon, clashing with those inside, even tossing some of the boys from the window. Three of the youths were injured in the fracas.

The heated atmosphere has to do with the increasing number and aggression in "price tag" attacks, and most recently, the sobering fact that Jews even attacked an IDF army base.

Fifty angry youths clashed with soldiers at the Ephraim Brigade, hurling firebombs (Molotov cocktails) and rocks and IDF vehicles after hearing rumors the military had more plans to throw Jewish families out of their hilltop homes in five communities under cover of darkness, in the icy cold dead of night.

The Civil Administration has made it a common practice to carry out expulsions and demolitions after midnight in order to minimize resistance by residents in surrounding areas and avoid the harsh light of media cameras.