Daily Israel Report

Infrastructures Minister: 'Oil Consumption Fuels Terror'

Minister Landau calls to fight terrorism by ending dependence on oil. The world needs “an alternative to Arab oil – now,” he says.
By Maayana Miskin & Yoni Kempinski
First Publish: 3/18/2010, 5:38 PM / Last Update: 3/18/2010, 5:44 PM

file

Minister of National Infrastructures Uzi Landau called Thursday to fight global terrorism by ending the world's dependence on oil from Muslim countries. The minister spoke to journalists as he prepared to leave for the United States, where he will take part in an AIPAC conference.

Landau said his primary mission during the upcoming trip is to discuss Israel and America's mutual need to reduce their dependency on foreign oil, and to develop alternatives to gasoline.

"Our quality of life is rising, and with it our need for oil... Oil is strategically necessary because of its monopoly in the field of transportation,” he said. “The West is enslaved to oil, and its dependence is growing. The West is addicted to oil, and so is bound by states that support terrorism... Whoever wants to fight radical Islam and terrorist organizations should know that by purchasing gasoline, he's giving terrorists increased motivation.”

The solution, Landau said, is to create forms of transportation that are not fueled by oil. There is no time to waste, he added. “We need to create alternatives. Not in 30 years. Not in 20 years. Now. Time is of the essence.”

Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu's government has recognized the importance of researching alternative sources of energy, and is providing funding to develop such alternatives, he said. “By taking away its primary source of funding, we can defeat terrorism without firing a single bullet,” he concluded.

'No Crisis with America'
Landau also mentioned the US's recent criticism of Israel for allowing Jews to build housing in northwestern Jerusalem. He echoed US President Barack Obama, saying, “There is no crisis. There is a difference of opinions.”

Israel and America's common interests go much deeper than the occasional difference of opinion, the minister said.