Jordan's Abdullah I & Zionism 1944

Yisrael Medad,

לבן ריק
לבן ריק
צילום: ערוץ 7
Yisrael Medad
I am a resident of Shiloh, with my wife and children, and now grandchildren, since 1981, having come on Aliyah in 1970. I have served in a volunteer capacity as a Yesha Council spokesperson, twice a member of Amana's secretariat, Benjamin Regional Council plenum member and mayor of Shiloh. I was a parliamentary aide for Geula Cohen and two other MKs, an advisor to a Minister, vice-chairman and executive director of Israel's Media Watch and was Information and Content Resource coordinator for the Begin Heritage Center. I am now Deputy Editor of the critical edition in anthology of Jabotinsky's writing in English.

Jordan, as I previously posted, is not being at all helpful in the matter of maintaining calm in Jerusalem, especially over the Temple Mount status quo.  It is also not promoting coexistence.

But that's not new.

Let's go back to 1944:

867N.00/3–344

[Document 635]

Amir Abdullah of Transjordan to President Roosevelt

Amman, March 3, 1944.

The deliberations of Congress affecting Palestine and the formation of a Jewish State therein have caused a great and heartfelt distress throughout the East. I say and I am convinced that the absence of sufficient information in the House of Congress respecting the true situation has facilitated the way to those in sympathy with the Zionist cause to further these deliberations. Remembering the great respect and admiration in which I hold you, your country and the American people, I say that while you are fighting with the United Nations for the freedom of the world and the removal of oppression at the same time the present deliberations are I feel contrary to that principle and would lead to the greatest sorrow and suffering if the intentions of the promoters of those deliberations were to be realized. I mention this personally in my capacity as a close neighbor of Palestine and as a loyal friend of the United Nations.

Abdullah

Oh, the reply:

In so far as Palestine is concerned, I am glad to convey to you the assurance that in the view of the Government of the United States no decision altering the basic situation of Palestine should be reached without full consultation with both Arabs and Jews.”   Hull

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