Holocaust Denial on University of Haifa Chat List

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The "ALEF" chat list operates under the auspices of the University of Haifa and on the University computer. It is monitored and controlled by Prof. Avraham Oz, a radical anti-Israel extremist and frequent collaborator with Ilan Pappe (see this page about him).

The list was originally set up to be a chat list for leftist Israeli academics. In fact there are almost no Israeli academics who post to it. It has become a chat list for anti-Semites and Neo-Nazis from all over the world. It has hosted longwinded "debates" by anti-Semites on the list who insist that Hitler was in fact innocent with regard to the Holocaust . One ALEF regular is a groupie of David Irving and has published sycophantic letters he wrote to Irving.

In recent days, other members of the list have been posting Holocaust Denial materials. Here is an example (spelling errors left uncorrected):

To : alef@list.haifa.ac.il
Subject : [alef] Italy: Thou Shalt Not Question the "official Holocaust narrative"

From: Miriam Reik (ALEF Regular)

The issue of Holocaust denial gets sillier and sillier. It is silly for the state to try to decide the truth of history--let historians do it--and criminalize any deviations. For the most part, in official circles of historical studies, holocaust denial has been marginalized and making a fuss about it puts it back in the spotlight. Those who believe everything in the official holocaust narrative would therefore be wise to let it be. Even sillier, however, is to regard holocaust deniers as ominous evil spirits so that an entire university has to be shut down upon their approach. Really!--Miriam
A step too far?
John Hooper
May 18, 2007 9:00 PM
http://commentisfree.guardian.co.uk/john_hooper/2007/05/a_step_too_far.html
Should Holocaust deniers be prevented from airing their views? And, if so, how far is it right to go in stopping them? The questions arise because of what happened over here on Thursday night in the central Italian university city of Teramo.
Robert Faurisson, a retired academic who has been convicted five times in his native France for denying crimes against humanity, had been invited by a member of the staff to give a lecture. His host is one Claudio Moffa, a professor who run the university's master's programme in Middle Eastern studies.
Moffa was asked by the university authorities to think again. He refused. So the rector, Mauro Mattioli, decided the only thing left was to temporarily shut down the university, which he did.
He said his decision was forced on him by security considerations. In a statement, the university authorities spoke of a "climate of tension that could endanger the safety of students".
Indeed, when Faurisson tried earlier today to speak at a hotel, there were scuffles with protesters and the event was cancelled. However, it is also worth noting that the rector had been given a clear indication by Italy's centre-left government of what was expected of him.
In a letter quoted by La Repubblica, the higher education minister, Fabio Mussi, said "inviting to an Italian campus a figure ... who denies the gravity of the Shoah has no academic merit, but merely bears witness to a mediocre provocation".
For professor Moffa, on the other hand, it is a question of academic and intellectual freedom. His website vaunts a declaration of support for his initiative, signed by more than 20 other Italian academics.
The professor claims that he is not himself a Holocaust denier. But his most recent relevant posting to the site is entitled "Why Faurisson and the 'deniers' convince me more and more".
Picking up on the prison sentence given to David Irving and the various penalties inflicted on his guest, he poses the following question: "Why is ... judicial harassment that smacks of manic obsession necessary if the arguments of Faurisson and Co are indeed 'unfounded'?"
Answers anyone?

Faurisson attacked by Zionist paramilitaries in Italy
By Daniele Scalea

Claudio Moffa, the professor of Afro-Asian history at the Universitא degli Studi of Teramo (Italy) organizes a master's degree named after former ENI's manager Enrico Mattei and dedicated to the Middle East. This year master's lessons took also a taboo theme in European countries: mythologization of the Holocaust and its exploitation by US and Israeli ruling classes for political and financial purposes. Level of master's lecturers and participants is high and their cultural background really various: among others, we could cite Moffa himself, Franco Cardini (famous historian), Massimo Fini (well-known journalist and philosopher), Tiberio Graziani (University of Perugia), Maurizio Blondet (journalist and essayist), Fabio Alberti (manager of a humanitarian NGO working in Iraq and Palestine), Vittorio Dan Segre (professor and former Israeli diplomat), Domenico Losurdo (philosophy professor), Israel Shamir (world-wide well-known reporter and essayist), Giulio Andreotti (former Italian premier), Samir al-Kassir (Syrian ambassador) and Abolfazl Zohrevand (Iranian ambassador). On the wave of master's great success and considering students' interest, Claudio Moffa also decided to invite Robert Faurisson, a controversial French professor who denied that Nazi persecution of Jews during the Second World War reached the quantitative and qualitative levels described by mainstream historiography. According to him, German leaders never ordered a genocide, homicidal gas chamber didn't exist and the number of Jewish victims is very much lower than six millions.
Because of his theories Faurisson was removed from his chair, deprived of pension, criminally prosecuted and subjected to some physical aggressions: nevertheless 78 years-old professor is still fighting for freedom of research in Europe. It's important to say that neither Faurisson nor Moffa have neo-Nazi affections: on the contrary, Claudio Moffa during his youth was active in a far leftist organization.
Invitation of Faurisson caused a lot of complains by Zionist movements and individuals, which yet had seen the Enrico Mattei master's program as "unfriendly" towards Israel. A number of Jewish personalities have signed a petition against freedom of speech, writing that nobody researching the Holocaust could go beyond some "unquestionable facts" (which obviously must be decided by the same petitioners!) and asking academic and political authorities to ban the event. Professor Moffa defended his initiative promoting a counter-petition in favour of freedom of speech, opinion and research (undersigned by hundreds of academicians, students, journalists and common people) and publicly inviting some of the critics to a cross-examination of Faurisson's lecture - but they all have refused.
Italian mainstream media, especially two Italian newspapers (post-communist "L'Unitא" and " la Repubblica", the latter owned by a Jewish billionaire), began an aggressive campaign against professors Moffa and Faurisson; moreover, some extremist Zionist organizations, such as the Simon Wiesenthal Centre, publicly asked the University of Teramo to forbid Faurisson's lecture. Just a few days before the event, in face of Moffa's refusal of cancel the lecture, University's Chancellor decided to close all buildings and rooms connected to Political Science Department. Even the Italian minister of university and research Fabio Mussi took side against Faurisson's lecture, but Claudio Moffa courageously didn't surrender and moved the event into a hotel in Teramo.
May 18th, professor Faurisson arrived at Teramo and, before the lecture, he gave a press conference in front of the hotel. But, just a few minutes after the end of the press conference, a small group of Zionist hooligans tried to attack the elderly French researcher. He was saved by the promptly reaction of professor Moffa and other onlookers. After that, Zionist riff-raff engaged in a brawl with some onlookers and policemen, injuring vice-chief constable Gennaro Capasso (a clavicle's fracture for him). Teramo's Chief Constable, rather than defend some quiet citizens from just 50 criminals, obliged Moffa and Faurisson to cancel the lecture and leave the county under escort.
But who were the attackers? They are some middle-aged Jews from Rome, members of the LED, (Lega Ebraica di Difesa), Italian branch of the J.D.L. ("Jewish Defense League") founded by the late Rabbi Meir Kahane. That organization supply paramilitary training to his members (some even volunteer in Tsahal, the Israeli army) and "guard" Jewish areas in Rome. LED actions are not only "defensive": often they physically attacked persons whose only "fault" is to have criticized Israeli politics. For example, in 1992 LED paramilitaries (armed with iron bars and revolvers) assaulted the office of a small right-wing political party, the Movimento Politico, literally destroying both office and party. In 1995 LED members attacked supporters of a Jesi basketball team who had insulted a Jewish player. In 1996, after absolution of an elderly former SS officer, Jewish paramilitaries surrounded the Military Tribunal of Rome, taking in hostage judges and attorneys until Italian Minister of Justice, with an unconstitutional decision, cancelled tribunal's sentence and ordered to re-arrest the accused. From 2002, LED has being responsible for a number of aggressions against leftist pro-Palestine militants. All those crimes remained unpunished. LED is not isolated among Italian Jews: Riccardo Pacifici, alleged leader of LED, is vice-president of Rome's Jewish community. The day after aggression, interviewed by an Italian newspaper, he not only refused to condemn the violence but also asked for removal of professor Moffa from his chair. In response, Claudio Moffa has started to organize the next year master's program. Moreover, it has been constituted a "Committee Against Repression of Freedom of Speech and Thinking" which is promoting a new appeal .
<>Daniele Scalea