"Sue the Barstids!"

We have trademark laws to prevent the theft of an established name. This is to stop some new-coming usurper who might try to trade on the good reputation and history established by an existing entity and thereby ruin the original owner of said name. And these trademark laws are not limited to the US; they are international.

Beth Goodtree,

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צילום: ערוץ 7
As in industry and commerce, a name can be everything. If someone in industry tries to use an established name, they get sued ten ways to Saturday (or Sunday). Well, 40 years ago, someone stole a 2,000-year old name and claimed it for their own. Time to sue them, get them to cease and desist, recover damages, and set the record straight as to who is who, who comes from where, who they are, and when they came. In other words, time to take back our names, our lives and our history. (Or as my mom, who avoided swearing the way she avoided insects, would say, "Sue the barstids!")

We have trademark laws to prevent the theft of an established name. This is to stop some new-coming usurper who might try to trade on the good reputation and history established by an existing entity and thereby ruin the original owner of said name. And these trademark laws are not limited to the US; they are international.

Because this theft of which I speak is unique in the annals of history, there is no direct precedent. However, there is much case law regarding similar situations. And in law, similar situations may be used to extend a law that does not cover new or evolving circumstance.

Take as an example the brand name and trademark McDonald's. Everyone knows this as a chain of fast food restaurants with a certain style of service and type of food. Recently, a man named McDonald, with no affiliation to the restaurant chain, opened a store that he called McDonald's. Even though his store was not in competition with the fast food chain, even though he used his own name for the store, even though he wanted nothing associated with the McDonald's food chain, he was forced to stop calling his place of business McDonald's.

Now, suppose some outside rogue group who wanted recognition, money and territory squatted on some sparsely populated land on the outskirts of the country of Iraq. Then they began calling themselves 'Sumerians' and their land 'Sumer', while claiming to be the original Iraqi people from ancient times. While this may seem silly, this is exactly what was done in another place way back in the 1960s (although the roots of this theft began in the 1940s).

The land that is now called Israel was, for 2,000 years, called Palestine. Although that was not its original name, it became the common accepted name of that land and of the people living there.* And the people living there were the Jews (also called Hebrews) who had a history associated with that land going back many thousands of years prior, as well as a continuous presence. (Certainly no Muslims lived there, because Islam is a late-comer in the world of religion and didn't even enter the scene until 4,300 years after the start of Judaism and 600 years after the Jews living in Palestine became known as 'Palestinian.')

All during the past 2,000 years, there has never been an Arab country called Palestine. Nor have Arabs been known as Palestinians -- they have merely been known as 'Arab', mostly because until the last century, when oil became a commodity, they were nomadic tribes living a primitive life of following their flocks without regard to boundaries or the higher civilized concepts of governance, borders, etc.

The Jewish homeland was always called Palestine (for the past 2,000 years) until the founding of Israel in 1948. However, by naming the new country 'Israel,' the name and history of Palestine and the Jewish people did not suddenly go up for grabs to the loudest, most violent and biggest lying thief. And there are laws to protect such thievery, although no one has yet used them in this context.

'Palestine' and 'Palestinian' can be considered similar to trademarks in that they refer to the name of a specific people as well as the products of that people -- a religion, an ethnicity, a culture and a history. And international law does not require a trademark to be legally registered. The first one to use a name and to have its use be continual is the one who has proprietary rights to said name.

Which brings us to the names of 'Palestine' and 'Palestinians'. Since the Jews were the first, by 2,000 years, to continually use the appellation 'Palestine' and 'Palestinian', we have the rights to those names and all that they imply. And lest anyone think that the term 'Israel' has replaced such usage, it has not. As long as there are books in print and being printed that still refer to Jews as 'Palestinians' and to the Jewish homeland as 'Palestine', this covers the 'continual usage' requirement.

So it is long overdue for the Arabs who are falsely and dishonestly using the name 'Palestinian' to cease and desist, and pay a penalty to include all the monies and land they have garnered through the criminal theft of the name and the history of the original and only Palestinians - the Jews. And if they have no idea what to truthfully call themselves, one of their own said it best. Zohir Muhsein, Executive Committee member of the Palestine Liberation Organization, said the following in an interview with the Dutch newspaper Trouw on March 31, 1977:

"The Palestinian people does not exist. The creation of a Palestinian state is only a means for continuing our struggle against the state of Israel for our Arab unity. In reality today there is no difference between Jordanians, Palestinians, Syrians and Lebanese. Only for political and tactical reasons do we speak today about the existence of a Palestinian people, since Arab national interests demand that we posit the existence of a distinct 'Palestinian people' to oppose Zionism."

In truth, those people now occupying Israeli land in Gaza, Judea and Samaria are just your average, common Arab, parasitically reaping the benefits of the stolen name and history of the Hebrew people. And even if the United Nation puts forth a mandate calling them the 'original' people, or the people who now 'own' the name, they cannot rewrite reality, legislate the truth, or negate centuries-old international law with an Islamist agenda and a swipe of the pen.

Note:
* Even some of our older citizens still refer to Israel and the Jews synonymously with Palestine and Palestinian. This point was hammered home to me when I adopted our dog. He came to America via Hong Kong, having been born in the Middle East. When I inquired as to where he was born, I was told "Palestine". Upon further inquiry as to where, the original owners then said "Israel".




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