Italy is the guinea pig for Europe's demographic suicide

Yes, the once Catholic country, has changed completely.

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Giulio Meotti,

giulio meott
giulio meott
צילום: עצמי

It is in Liguria, one of the most touristic Italian regions, that archeologists made the discovery of the oldest remains of Homo Sapiens in Europe. A few years ago, in the Ligurian town of Riparo Bombrini, a team of archaeologists discovered two teeth belonging to the oldest Homo sapiens. But Liguria today has another less enviable record: it is the oldest and most sterile region in Europe. 

Italy lost 25,000 people in 2010 due to the demographic crisis. But if it had the same rate of Liguria and Genoa, it would have lost 250,000: an apocalypse.

Liguria is the eighth richest Italian region. A very wealthy area. Yet, the world studies Liguria to understand the future of countries committing suicide. The percentage of people over 75 years old in the Italian region of Liguria, already 13 percent, the highest figure across Europe, will rise to 18 percent by 2030. 

Savona is the province of Liguria where 28.1 per cent of the population is over 65 (only two years ago the percentage was 27 per cent). In Liguria, the elderly are over 433,000, almost one-third of the population. Liguria is also the region with the largest number of abortions in Italy: 11.87 cases per 1,000 women. This process of self liquidation began in the time when Genoa, Liguria’s capital, held the medals of consumerism: more smoking, more electrodes, more TVs, more perfumes and beauty creams.

But Genoa was already a city of old people who had no time to deliver children into the world.

On June 30, 2016, 1 million and 566 thousand people lived in Liguria. Only three years before, in 2013, there were 1 million and 591 thousand: 24,900 more. As if in the meantime a city like Ventimiglia had disappeared. In Liguria, the family is dying as the cell of society (in 2008, Liguria held first place for the number of divorces in relation to the population). In the first nine months of 2016, 1,022 weddings were celebrated in Genoa, down from 1,115 in the first nine months of 2015 (-8.3%). The Ligurians are at the top of the Italian singles ranking. 


Over the last 20 years one inhabitant out of four of Genoa emigrated or died. 
Schools and maternity wards are closing. International conferences are organized in the city with emblematic titles: "Genoa after the depopulation", realized in collaboration with the University of Genoa and the European Commission. In 20 years one inhabitant out of four of Genoa emigrated or died. 

Welcome to Europe’s future. It is not a sci-fiction movie. It is happening right now!