Bottom line: Trump gave Netanyahu a free hand

Trump’s message to Netanyahu is – lead me. Tell me what you want and we’ll work it out. But don’t ask for too much. Not all at once.

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Jack Engelhard,

Jack Engelhard
Jack Engelhard
צילום: מתוך האתר האישי

The most important business to emerge from the Washington briefing between the two leaders was that finally Benjamin Netanyahu has fallen out of love with the nutty “two state solution.” Took a while, or maybe all it took was a friend in the White House – and President Donald Trump was never in love with it in the first place except as a favor to Netanyahu.

Netanyahu came to make amends, first with a White House that was rid of Pharaoh. We can only imagine Netanyahu’s relief. Next, Netanyahu had to win back his conservative supporters in Israel who insinuated that all would be forgiven if he’d use this blessing, Trump’s America, to quit being a sheep but to roar like a lion.

Roar like a lion, Netanyahu did.  


For Trump, Israel is a New York kosher deli; something warm, comfortable, familiar. It’s loud. It’s crazy. It’s family.
He came straight out and said that Israel is sovereign over the entire Land…going back to the days of the Hebrew Bible.

Palestinian state? Dream on.

That’s the Bibi the people elected but seldom got…or didn’t get enough.

For Trump, Israel is a New York kosher deli; something warm, comfortable, familiar. It’s loud. It’s crazy. It’s family. People yell. People complain.

It’s too hot, too cold, too expensive, the service is too slow, the waiter is so rude, but no one leaves angry and everybody comes back. There is no other word for it except heimish and Trump knows this from his frequent noshes at the Second Avenue Deli (where I’ve seen him plenty of times) and from his very own mishpacha.

Those were not two world leaders meeting up to decide the fate of the world. Those were two old pals who’d lost touch and happy to catch up and resume.   

Trump’s demeanor at the Wednesday news conference was casual, or perhaps distracted. He’s got more than Israel on his mind.

(Trump is facing the heavy boots of the mindless Left who are marching in lockstep as a single mob with one purpose – to get him.)

So if you expected all of Israel’s wishes to come true and gift-wrapped with ribbons – that is not how it works, not in politics and not in life.

Trump’s message to Netanyahu is – lead me. Tell me what you want and we’ll work it out. But don’t ask for too much. Not all at once.

Hence there was hardly any mention about moving the United States Embassy to Jerusalem. But it was only Wednesday.

Israel has been around for more than 3,000 years so let’s not be hasty – precisely Trump’s point. Give me time. Give me a chance to figure things out.

Such as “the settlements,” which was also the most important business to emerge from the summit, and which so many people got wrong.

Yes, Trump said to hold back on the settlements “a little bit.”

Which sounds more like a gentle suggestion than US policy, but has people saying that Trump caught Netanyahu unawares and unhappy.

Not so. Trump was signaling build, but shut up about it, as we had it here on Arutz Sheva as we saw Trump teaching Netanyahu a lesson on the art of keeping your cards tucked in “a little bit.” Don’t tell the world every move you intend to make and I don’t want to know about it, either.

Otherwise that leaves you out in the cold, Trump is saying, and puts me on the spot.

Both men agreed that the hatred and incitement must end from the Palestinian side before anything can be done and that the Iran deal was Obama’s most awful blunder and that this purposeful vendetta now posed a threat to both the United States and Israel.

President Trump will get around to this as well, but won’t tip his hand until the time is right.

For the Prime Minister of Israel, the time was perfect to start anew with a good old reliable friend, which means Donald Trump and the United States of America.

But there may be no big fixes all at once. Both men need some time to learn from one another; what’s best for Israel and what’s best for America.

Fortunately, it amounts to the same thing.

New York-based bestselling American novelist Jack Engelhard writes a regular column for Arutz Sheva. New from the novelist: “News Anchor Sweetheart,” a novelist’s version of Fox News and Megyn Kelly. Engelhard is the author of the international bestseller “Indecent Proposal.” For books like his award-winning memoir “Escape from Mount Moriah,” he is the recipient of the Ben Hecht Award for Literary Excellence. Website: www.jackengelhard.com








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